Tag Archives: gnome

Network-Manager 0.9.2 WiFi password issues

I've noticed a few significant issues with Network Manager on GNOME 3.2, when connecting to WiFi networks that require password (e.g. WPA, EAP). Trying to find existing bug reports, I've found quite a mess: multiple bug reports, both downstream (Debian, Ubuntu, Fedora) and upstream (GNOME bugzilla).

I suspect many of these bugs are related to the same root cause (or max. 2-3 root causes). In order to try and make sense of this, I tried to categorize the bugs I've found. I hope it'll help to gather more info to resolve the bugs, and reject dups.

  1. NM (gnome applet?) forgets passwords:
    1. GNOME Bugzilla: [666465], [665431], [665503]
    2. Debian BTS: [651445], [646018]
    3. Ubuntu BTS: [904666]
    4. Mint forum post with a workaround
  2. NM takes too long to re-connect after resume (possibly problem in popping up the enter-password dialog box):
    1. GNOME: [664289],
    2. Debian: [651358], [653076]
  3. NM-gnome double password dialog box case:
    1. GNOME: [661208], [665503] - mentioned in 1st comment,
    2. Debian: [651097]

I'll try to update this post when new info arrives, please add your comments.

Generally speaking, I think that FOSS community lacks some "dirty-work" QA workforce for bug scrubbing, such as what I'm trying to do here. I don't even know how to name this non-coding activity. Thoughts? 🙂

Update1: This Linux Mint forum post suggests that only the applet "forgets" passwords.


Reviving the hibernate feature on Debuntu

My laptop's battery had just died. It made me realize how much I depend on it, for changing my working location, either when computer is awake or asleep for many hours. Without a battery, the sleep (aka suspend-to-ram) feature is less useful, for the tiniest power interruption would kill it. Continue reading

Surprising new keyboard shortcuts

(Well, surprising me, at least)

It's been a while since I wrote these two posts about keyboard shortcut, so I'll try to summarize some neat ones I've recently learned:

Unix Shell

  • Ctrl+U deletes all characters on the cursor's left. And.. keep it in the shell's clipboard.
  • Ctrl+K deletes all characters to the cursor's right (including the cursor's position), keeps in clipboard.
  • Ctrl+Y: paste clipboard.
  • Ctrl+R: search for string in history. Multiple Ctrl+R's search for the next matches in history. Btw, It's F7/F8 on windows command prompt.

Google vim keys and more

  • Google search: Google Experimental Search, enables vim keys for browsing the results! Super useful.
  • Google Calendar support vim keys (j, k, l, m) for navigating in the calendar. Type "?" for more keyboard shortcuts.

GNOME

  • Alt+F10 toggles between maximal window size and original window size.
  • Alt+F9 minimizes window
  • Alt+F8 switches to resize window mode
  • Alt+F1 opens the GNOME menu.

Thanks for Zohar and Aviv for presenting me with most of the above shortcuts.

KDE: a call for a change (or: why I moved to GNOME)

[Disclaimer: I'm merely a KDE user, hardly involved with the KDE development processes; my criticism is based on what I see as a user, I'll be glad to be corrected in the comments]

Back when I started my way with Linux with the brand new RedHat 6.0 (which as always, preferred GNOME). KDE always went forward: KDE1 was pretty.. basic, KDE2 was a big step, and same goes from KDE3. I've been using KDE 3.5.x for quite a long while (RHEL/CentOS5 and Debian sid until recently). 3.5.x symbolizes, in my opinion, the last "winning' era of KDE:  It had the right features, but more important: it was mature and stable.

KDE 4 introduced important improvements:

  • User interface continued the tradition of being much nicer than its predecessors. Compare for yourselves: KDE 1 2 3 4
  • Very nice OpenGL effects were added with two important advantages over GNOME+ Compiz: the OpenGL features are fully integrated inside KDE, configuration is way easier (Compiz configuration tool is scary), and the attitude is more towards productivity and less toward eye-candiness. For example, instead of the useless wobbling windows and water effects of Compiz, KDE provides the useful feature that displays all open windows and allows search-as-you-type for choosing the right application by its name, by simply putting the mouse pointer  on the top-left corner.
  • Simplified user interface: the developers had the courage to do some rewrites and strip complicated GUIs, even lose some features, and make the new KDE 4 apps more simple. This is mostly notable in konsole and amarok.

But, it also got worse than its predecessors on some areas:

Continue reading